Backyard Notes #2


Well, our little wood frog seems to have moved to his winter quarters to hibernate away the winter under a rock or in the brush pile or under a thick layer of leaf litter.  He’s been a constant resident of our little backyard pond since he came to us a a tadpole in early summer.

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This is one of the tadpoles in transition. I don’t know if this is the one that grew up into our little wood frog. The grackles took a toll on the tadpoles until they grew up enough to evade the hungry birds.
We came home from vacation, and there was this little green frog among the weeds on a rock by the side of the little pond.

We came home from vacation, and there was this little green frog among the weeds on a rock by the side of the little pond.

Notice lunch sitting on the blade of grass in the upper left.

Notice lunch sitting on the blade of grass in the upper left.

He (or she)  was a constant presence in our little pond all through the summer.  Sometimes he would be hanging in the water with just his nose and eyes above the surface.  Occasionally, he would sit on one of the lily pads.  Most often he sat on one of the rocks that surround the pond.

I watched him once in a while hoping to see him catch a fly or a gnat with his tongue.  But I never did see that.  We did, however, several times see him suddenly leap into the air from his place on a rock, catch a flying insect in mid-air, and then splash down into the pond.

Over the course of the summer, he seemed to become accustomed to our presence.  Only when we would walk up on him suddenly would he spring in a flash of green from his rock into the center of the pond and disappear into the dark water.  But if we approached the pond slowly and without a lot of noise or extraneous motion, he would keep his place on the side of the pond, though I had the sense that he was alert to our presence and ready to make a quick dive if he needed to.

Keeping an eye of the giant with the camera, he lets the other eye drift over to the fly sitting on a blade of grass in the foreground.

Keeping an eye of the giant with the camera, he lets the other eye drift over to the fly sitting on a blade of grass in the foreground

As the summer slid into fall, our little green friend seemed to spend more time in the water and less time on his rocks.  Still, any hint of sunshine would always bring him up on the rocks to soak in some warmth.

Here our little frog neighbor hangs in the water.

Here our little frog neighbor hangs in the water.

As October wore on, I went out to the pond regularly to check on my little neighbor.  Frost began to come on, starting as a light coating on the grass in the open areas of the lawn.  By the time I got my last picture of our little friend, we had already had several hard frosts that required the use of scrappers before we could drive the cars.  And still, by mid-day, our froggy neighbor could be see hanging in the water.

This was the last picture I took of our little green friend this year.  I found him here lounging in the water.  This was after a couple of hard frosts.  But he remained active for another week or so after this picture.

This was the last picture I took of our little green friend this year. I found him here lounging in the water. This was after a couple of hard frosts. But he remained active for another week or so after this picture.

In the second week of October, we had our first snow.  Down here in the valley, where we live, the accumulation only amounted to about an inch, and by afternoon it was melted away.  Up on the hills, there was more, and it lasted through the day.  I went out late that day, a bit anxious that this time I would find a little frozen frog’s body floating in the pond.  But I found no sign of him.  I assumed he had finally gone to cover for the winter.  Yet a day or so later, I walked briskly toward the back of the yard, and as I past the pond, I was startled to realize my little neighbor was perched on the rim of the pond liner sitting very upright.  Before I could catch myself and slow down, I saw a quick blur of brown-green, and he was gone in a splash into the dark pond.

That was over a week ago.  Since then, the nights and the days have gotten chillier and wetter.  I haven’t been out to the pond every day, but I haven’t seen him at all since that last splash.  I’m pretty sure that he has finally sought out a hidden, sheltered place to wait out the winter.  I’ll wait now, with a little anxiety, for those first warm days in early spring, hoping suddenly to find him settled down on a flat rock by the side of the pond, catching some rays and some early bugs.

© 2009 Gary A. Chorpenning

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Comments
2 Responses to “Backyard Notes #2”
  1. Ah, spring time…one of my favorites. I bet you will see your little neighbor when the sunshine returns. I enjoyed your story. It reminds me of the lyrics to an Elizabeth McMahon song. She is a song writer and puppeteer. She has a great appreciation for nature. From her album Waltzing with Fireflies –

    The Earth is still sleeping from a long winter’s nap
    She is quietly resting with a quilt on her lap
    The robin’s and blackbirds will waken her soon
    But for now she is dreaming of the spring time and you.

    http://www.mrsmcpuppet.com/waltzingwithfireflies.htm

    Like

  2. The most difficult part is that some “winters” are extremely longer than others. Thankfully though, there are signs of Goodness throughout all seasons. The anxiety fades with time and is replaced with peace
    after repetitive assurance of Spring 😦 —–> :).

    Like

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